The Family of Rita Edith Marvulli

Rita Edith Marvulli is my 2x Great Aunt. She was born November 22, 1862 in Grumo Appula, Bari, Italy to Domenico Marvulli and Rosa D’Armiento.

Rita’s birth certificate 

Birth Certificate - Rita Marvulli p.1

Birth Certificate - Rita Marvulli p.2

On December 6, 1890 Rita Edith married Gaetano Caso of Grumo Appula, son of Michele Caso and Domenica Verni.

Marriage Certificate - Gaetano

 

Marriage Certificate - Gaetano -2

Rita and Gaetano had 7 children of which only 3 survived.  Their first child, a boy, named Michele/Michael was born on October 26, 1892,  followed by the loss of  4 daughters between 1893 and 1897, 3 who were named Domenica & 1 Rosa.  A second son was then born named Domenico on May 6, 1900, followed by Domenica Margharita born April 11, 1903.

GaetanoCaso1 copy

A stone mason by trade, Gaetano boarded the ship SS California and arrived in New York  on Jan, 11, 1905. He was traveling to his cousin Luigi Mitarotondo.

SS California

If the name of Mitarotondo sounds vaguely familiar to you, it should. In my post of August 25, 2017 I wrote about a group of Grumo cousins immigrating to New York in 1903, most all traveling to their cousin Luigi Mitarotondo. One specifically was Francesco Civitano, son of Vito Luigi brother to my great grandfather Vincenzo Civitano.

Gaetano’s wife Rita left from the port in Naples and traveled with her son Domenico (5) and daughter Margharita (2) arrived on Sept. 11, 1905 and joined her husband Gaetano living at 112 Stone Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. (now renamed Mother Gaston Blvd, Brooklyn) Son Michele had been left behind.

Michele (16)  (Michael) joined his family on Nov. 16, 1908 arriving in Boston, Mass. At that time his family were now living at 4150 Bergen St., Brooklyn. Gaetano was using the name Thomas and working as a laborer at odd jobs. Gaetano, Rita and Michele only spoke Italian but children Domenick and Margharita (Margaret) spoke English. Michele was a laborer, working in a coal yard. I located an immigration record for son Michael scheduled to sail to his family in 1907. Something happened and he never made that first voyage but arrived the following year in 1908. Michele had a bad/blinded eye. The story I have heard was that it had happened in a work accident; a stone particle may have blinded him. Perhaps he was injured at that time of his first travel date and that was the reason for the delay in his sailing.

In 1915 on the census the address for the family was recorded as 2150 Bergen St., Brooklyn (4150 in 1910). This could have been a census error or an actual move. I can  not be sure. Gaetano (50) was working as a mason, Michael’s (23) profession was difficult to read (?) Lab for laborer (?) Domenick and Margaret (recorded as Michelina) were both in their teens, in school, and Mom Rita was a housewife.

Before I leave this 1915 census I wanted to make mention of the family below the Caso’s, Antonio Nuzzi. This family was also living next to the Caso’s in the 1910 census (4150 address) If the addresses are correct it would appear that this family had moved and relocated again next to the Caso’s. ****this is an edit to my original posting. I had questioned if  “they might be connected” They are. Rita Marvulli’s great grandparents were Domenico Marvulli and Margherita Nuzzi. I have not researched and followed this line but we see here that, again the branches of our tree have continued to entwine and remain connected here in America.

I was unable to find a 1920c record for the family however the WW1 draft record for Michael (1917) told me the family was living. 432 1/2 W. 25th St. N.Y.C.. Michaels parent’s would continue living at the 25th St address for some years to come. What’s wonderful about this document is that it says that Michael had a ‘Blind R. Eye’, line 9 indicates that his parents were dependent on him and line 12 that he was claiming an exemption from service.

005263041_03544

On September 12, 1918 brother Domenick Caso would also register for the WW1 draft with the same listed address.He was working as a machinist for a company named Kiley & Mueller.

005263041_03543

 

Welcome to the fabulous Roaring 20’s

On June 12th, 1921 Michele Caso married Rosa DiGirolamo in Manhattan.

Wedding-Michele Caso &RosaDiGirolamo copy

New York, New York, Marriage Certificate Index 1866-1937

Name: Michele Caso
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 12 Jun 1921
Marriage Place: Manhattan, New York, USA
Spouse: Rosa Digirolamo
Certificate Number: 15898

The early 20’s was certainly a time of change for the Caso’s. Not only did son Michael say        ‘I do’ but the following year on December 3rd, 1922 daughter Domenica (Margaret) married Vincenzo Locorriao.

Name Domenica Caso
Gender Female
Marriage Date 3 Dec 1922
Marriage Place Manhattan, New York, USA
Spouse Vincenzo Locorriao
Certificate Number 30529
Household Members

Brother Domenico was next in 1923. On October 25th he said ‘I do’ to Rose Haughey. (I think her dress and hair piece is absolutely glorious)

CasoDomenick:Roseoriginally shared by KarenBick77, 2009 (Ancestry)

Name: Domenico Caso
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 25 Oct 1923
Marriage Place: Manhattan, New York, USA
Recorded Marriage Year: 1924
Spouse: Rose Haughey

 

All three of Rita and Gaetano’s children were married now and beginning their own families here in America. What an exciting time for the Caso’s from Grumo Appula.

1925: Gaetano (61) and Rita (61) were living at 432 1/2 W. 25th St., NYC. This was the address from Michael and Domenick’s WW1 document. Gaetano was working as a factory porter. From this point I will began to follow the story of their children and their families.

Below is a photo of Domenick and Rose Caso, taken in 1928. I like to imagine them as great adventurers. This was 25 years following the first flight by the Wright brothers. Flying was truly still in it’s infancy and I know for sure I would never have gone up in anything like that. I wonder if Rose flew?

DominickCaso&Wife RoseAirplane copyoriginally shared by KarenBick77, 2009 (Ancestry)

By 1930 Domenick and his wife Rose had moved to Queens and were living at 40-65 97th St.. Domenick (29), was working as a machinist to support his growing family. Wife Rose (26), had been born in New York, but both parents were from Ireland. They now had three children, Robert (5), Rita (4 7/12) and Arthur (7/12)

Michael and his family were living at 446 W. 25th St., NYC. He was working as a plumber. Rosa and Michael had added children Rita (8), and Gaetano (6). On December 3, 1932 daughter Vita would be born making their family complete.

Margaret and Vincenzo had moved to Jersey and were living at 38 Wallis Street, Jersey City. I was unable read Vincenzo’s occupation on the census. They too have added a daughter named Rita (4) along with Laura (6) Mary (3) and Leonard (1). Margharita and Vincenzo went on to have three more children, Geatano (1931), Helen (1933) and Gloria (1940). *of note, the spelling of the families last name from marriage license to now had changed and would remain Locorriere.

Margharita and children 1928

MARGUERITE CASO copyoriginally shared by KarenBick77, 2009 (Ancestry)

 

I was able to locate the Petitions of Naturalization for both Michele and Rosa Caso. Both record a different wedding date on their documents. Rosa listed April 28th, 1921 and Michele’s says June 12, 1921, the same as the recorded marriage license for the state. Rosa said she arrived here in the U.S. on April 15, 1921. That would be just days before her marriage. The differences in dates could have been that one was the actual wedding date and the other the recorded date. Regardless, it is clear they were married very shortly after she arrived.

Michele’s Petition of Naturalization 

31301_168481-00823

31301_168481-00822

Rosa’s Petition of Naturalization 

31301_168882-00766

Sometime in 1935 Michele took his family to Italy for a visit. Below is the passenger record for their return trip home, arriving in N.Y. on the 21st of Sept 1935. Traveling was Michele (42) Rosa (34) Rita (13) Gaetano (12) and Vita (2). On the manifest, page 2 they had been visiting with Antonio DiGirolamo, Aspromonte,  listed as the place. Aspromonte is in the Province of Reggio, Calabria and is a National Park. At this point in my research I have not been able to discover who Antonio DiGirolamo was that they were visiting. I suspect a brother or he could have been an Uncle to Rosa. (Rosa’s father was named Giuseppe) The reference to Aspromonte could be referring to many towns in that area as well. It was not a specific town.

NYT715_5708-0279

NYT715_5708-0280

 

1939 Domenick Caso Family Photo ~ Robert, Gaetano, Rita, Rita, Arthur and Rose 

CASO FAMILY.Robert,Gaetano,Rita,Arthur,Rosejpg copyoriginally shared by KarenBick77 2009 (Ancestry)

By  the 1940’s the families of all the children were strongly established.

Parents/grandparents Gaetano and Rita were in their 70’s, still on W. 25th St., N.Y.C.. I payed close attention with this census as it would be the last time I would find them in a census. Neither had ever attended school, neither had become citizens of the U.S., they had been in this home/apt in 1935. Gaetano had only used Thomas once on a census record although he was known by that name as well and only one time was his occupation listed as a mason, his profession from Italy.

The Locorriere were still in New Jersey but now at 151 Grand Ave., North New Bergan, N.J.. Vincenzo was working on his own account supporting his family in the ice and coal business. This was the same business most of my Civitano family members were involved in. I have not mentioned much about Vincenzo Locorriere but he too is from Grumo Appula. His parents were Vincenzo Locorriere and Laura Antonelli both of Grumo. Marghrita using Domenica on the 1940 census, was tending the children and the home. Children Laura (16) and Rita (14) had both completed the 1st year of high school, Mary (13) highest grade completed had been 6 and Leonard (11), 5th grade.  Both Gaetano (9) and Helen (7)  had completed 1st grade, Gloria (3/12) .

Michele (46) and Rosa (39) were still on W. 25th but at number 438, close to his parents. They were living at that same address in 1935 as well. Michele is working as a laborer in what appears to be a pipe manufacturing company and Rosa is tending house and the kids. Rita (18), Guy (Gaetano 16), Vita (7). Listed for schooling is the highest grade completed for each child, Rita 3rd year high school, Guy 1st year high school, Vita 1st grade.

By 1942 Michele registered for the ‘Old Mans’ WW11 draft but I did not find a record for brother Domenick.

NY-2283443-5753

 

Gaetano and Rita 1942

CasoGaetano&Rita copyoriginally shared by KarenBick77 2009 (Ancestry)

As this extended family entered the 1950’s much sadness descended on them Sadly,  Domenick would precede his parents in death. He passed away Feb. 16th, 1950 from pancreatic cancer. He was buried in a family plot (see below) I noticed that on both this death record for Domenick and the WW11 document for Michael, that they list the same place of employment for the two brothers, Kieley & Mueller, a paint store, in Newark, N.J. (The WW1 document for Domenick also had Kieley & Mueller listed for his employment but as a machinist.)

 

Rita (86) passed away on March 3, 1950 and Gaetano (86) passed a few weeks later on
April 30th, 1950. All three are buried at Calvary Cemetery in Woodside, Queens, New York.

Caso - Calvary Cemetery

The story of this extended Caso Family is far from over but for Gaetano Caso and Rita Edith Marvulli, sister of my great grandmother Nicoletta Marvulli, may they rest in peace and their memory be a blessing for those who have followed them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “The Family of Rita Edith Marvulli

  1. I love all those photographs—you are so fortunate to have them, but you know that. This family’s story is really the story of so many immigrants—struggling to make a living, moving from place to place, and seeing the next generations have it a little easier.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. More kudos to NW PAINTEDLADY…this most recent addition was one of my personal favorites, partly because it represents a piece of my own ancestry, as I actually knew some of the characters from my early childhood, but it’s also another piece of an enormous puzzle…of a time we now can hardly imagine living in.

    Liked by 1 person

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